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Monthly Archives: December 2009

Configuring Client Access Array for Exchange 2010 – Walkthrough

In the previous post we configured the Database Availability Group of Exchange 2010. In this post I will show you how to configure Exchange 2010 RPC Client Access Array. Previous Exchange versions (Exchange 2000/2003) did not support to the use the front-end server by internal MAPI clients. They were connected directly to internal Back-End servers via MAPI over RPC. With the introduction of Exchange server 2007 this limitation has decreased significantly. Client Access Server worked for most protocols except MAPI clients.

With Exchange Server 2010 all protocols should go through the Client Access Server and cannot connect to Mailbox servers by MAPI clients directly. This has been done by introducing a new Client Access Server(CAS) service known as the RPC Client Access service.

To configure Exchange Server 2010 CAS array, you should follow the five steps mentioned bellow.

  1. You must configure internal DNS entry for the name of the CAS array. This name must be unique for the internal network.
  2. You must configure Network Load Balancing. In this case i use Windows Network Load Balancing technology.
  3. Create the new Client Access Array.
  4. Configure a mailbox database to use Cas Array 
  5. Verify the Autodiscover services is working with CAS Array. (This step is optional, but it would be good to verify this)

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Architecture of Clients connecting through a CAS array to a mailbox database

Step 1 – Configure Internal DNS

1) Open DNS services manager in Administrative tools and add new a “A Record(Host)” for the Client Access Server array. I used “Client” as CAS Array name and 200.200.201.120 as IP Address of CAS Array. See figure 1.

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Figure 1

Step 2 – Configure Network Load Balancing for the Client Access Server Array.

2.1) You must install Windows Network Load balancing feature in CAS servers, where you are supposed to configure CAS array. Run below commend in Powershell. See figure 2 and 3.

Import-Module ServerManager

Add-WindowsFeature NLB

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Figure 2: Running “Import-Module ServerManager

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Feature 3: Running “Add-WindowsFeature NLB

You will see the screen below after successful NLB installation. See figure 4.

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Figure 4.

2.2) Start Network Load Balancing Manager by following – Start / All Programs / Administrative Tools/ Network Load Balancing Manager. See figure 5.

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Figure 5: Network Load Balancing Manager.

2.3 ) Click Cluster –> New to create a new NLB Cluster. In the Host section add Netbios name or ip address of the first Client Access Server. In this scenario first CAS Netbios name is “EX10-CAHT”. Then click Next. See figure 6.

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Figure 6.

2.4) Here you can see the parameters of the NLB cluster. Leave it as default. Click Next. See figure 7.

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Figure 7: New Cluster: Host Parameters

2.5) Then you should add the IP Address of the CAS array. All clients should connect via this ip address and you must give the IP Address that you added in DNS manager during A Record creation. In this scenario it was 200.200.201.120. Then click ok and next. See figure 8.

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Figure 8: Adding IP Address for CAS Array.

2.6) In this screen you must add Full Internet Name and Select Cluster Operation Mode. Give the internal FQDN for the Full Internet Name and Select Multicast as shown below. See Figure 9.

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Figure 9:- Adding FIN and selecting operating mode.

2.7) Then appears the Port Rules screen. Leave it as default. Click Finish. See figure 10.

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Figure 10: Port Rules.

2.6) At this point we have created a new NLB cluster. Then we must add the next Client Access Server(S) to the NLB. Right click the cluster name and click Add Host to Cluster. In this scenario our second CAS server is EX10-CAHT02. Then click Next and Finish. See figure 11 and 12.

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Figure 11

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Figure 12: Adding Second node’s Netbios name.

Now you can see Windows NLB has been created. See Figure 13.

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Figure 13: NLB Manager

Step 3 – Create Client Access Server Array

3.1) We don’t have any pre-Created CAS arrays in this Organization. But would be better to check is there are any pre-created CAS Arrays. Run below command. if you didn’t create a CAS Array before, you will get nothing .  See figure 14.

Get-ClientAccessArray

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Figure 14.

3.2) Then you should create new Client Access Array. Run below Cmdlet in EMS. See Figure 15.

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Figure 15: Creating new CAS Array.

Now we have finished creating an NLB and a CAS array. Then we must associate databases with this CAS Array.

Step 4 – Adding Mailbox Databases to Client Access Server Array

Now we have come to the final step, that is need to add mailbox database to the Client access server array.

4.1) Use below CMDLet to add mailbox database to CAS array. Here we can add all mailbox databases at once as shown as shown  below. See Figure 16.

Get-MailboxDatabase | Set-MailboxDatabase -RPCClientAccessServer “Client.msglab.local”

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Figure 16 : Adding MailBox databases to the CAS Array.

Step 5 – Configuring Outlook 2010 using Auto Discover

Now when Outlook connects to the Exchange Server, the CAS Array name Appears as client.msglab.local. See figure 17.

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Figure 17: Account Information of Outlook

You can see below actual connections made by Outlook. See figure 18.

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Figure 18: Connection Status

 

Note- Client Access Array is only used by MAPI Clients to connect MailBox ,Public Folders and Active Directory only. You must use Windows NLB or another 3rd party NLB solution to load balance Active Sync, AutoDiscover and Availability Services.

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Posted by on December 16, 2009 in CAS, Exchange 2010, High Availability

 

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Configuring Exchange 2010 Database Availability Groups

Exchange 2010 RTM has been released a few weeks back. Exchange 2010 came with some cool new features compared to previous versions and also some major differences in the field of High Availability. All High availability scenarios which came with previous Exchange server versions have been removed in this version.

Exchange server 2010 doesn’t have LCR, CCR or SCR high availability options, instead it has DAG (Database Availability Group) . You can achieve your high availability goal with DAG adding minimum 2 database copies and up to 16 database copies. DAG uses Continues replication technology that was first introduced with Exchange 2007 and DAG is essentially a combination of CCR and SCR that was available in Exchange 2007. You can find more information of DAG here.

Best practices of Database Availability Group

  1. Need to run two network adaptors on DAG nodes to support Windows Clustering.
  2. Be aware of choosing server hardware for DAG nodes. Because exchange DAG node should have the ability to manage load of replica of other master copies.
  3. Should be plan proper IP address schema for current and future requirements.
  4. Running NLB and DAG on same node isn’t support by Microsoft.
  5. Must disable Power Management setting on both BIOS and windows configurations.
  6. Test failover and failback before migrating users to DAG databases.
  7. Need to monitor DAG health periodically.
  8. Make Sure Database names are unique.
  9. Periodically move the master database among other DAG nodes to verify DAG is working properly.

In this article I’ll show you how to configure DAG using Exchange management Shell. Here I’ll use two DAG member servers, one  Hub transport, client access server and one domain controller.

Step 1 – Creating  new DAG

Create new database availability group using Exchange management shell. Run CMDlet  given below in the exchange management shell. This Cmdlet contains file share witness server name, DAG IP address for MAPI network and DAG name. (See figure 1)

New-DatabaseAvailabilityGroup -Name E14-DAG -WitnessServer EX10-CAHT -WitnessDirectory “c:\FSW” -DatabaseAvailabilityGroupIPAddresses 200.200.201.100 –Verbose

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Figure 1 – Creating new DAG

Step 2 – Add first node to the DAG

At this point  DAG has been created, but DAG has no DAG members yet. So we should run cmdlet given below to add EX10-MB01 server to DAG. (See figure 2).

Add-DatabaseAvailabilityGroupServer -Identity E14-DAG -MailboxServer EX10-MB01 -Verbose

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Figure 2 – Adding first node to the DAG.

Step 3 – Add second node to the DAG.

Add-DatabaseAvailabilityGroupServer -Identity E14-DAG -MailboxServer EX10-MB02 -Verbose

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Figure 3 – Adding second node to the DAG.

Step 4 – Verify DAG through the Exchange Management Shell

Now we have finished creating DAG and adding members to that . Now we can see some new information via EMS made by the DAG.

Use Get-DatabaseAvailabilityGroup Cmdlet to verify DAG installation. Run this CMDlet in EMS. (See figure 4).

Get-DatabaseAvailabilityGroup -Identity E14-DAG –Status

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Figure 4: Display operational Servers  

We can see E14-DAG has been added to the Exchange and EX10-MB01 and EX10-MB01 have been added to the DAG as members.

Run Get-DatabaseAvailabilityGroupNetwork Cmdlet to see available Network settings for the DAG. Run the CMdlet given below  in EMS. (See figure 5).

Get-DatabaseAvailabilityGroupNetwork -Identity E14-DAG

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Figure 5: Display available Network Settings for the DAG.

At this point we have created the DAG.  Now we should add the Database copies to the DAG. Run CMDlet given below to replicate MB01 with EX10-MB02 and replicate MB02 with EX10-MB01 servers. See figure 6.

Add-MailboxDatabaseCopy -Identity MB01 -MailboxServer EX10-MB02

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Figure 6: Adding MB01 database to EX10-MB02

Add-MailboxDatabaseCopy -Identity MB02 -MailboxServer EX10-MB01

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Figure 7 : Adding MB02 database to EX10-MB01

At this point we have configured the DAG successfully. Now we should verify if whether  the DAG is configured or not . 

Run Get-MailboxDatabaseCopyStatus to monitor the overall health check of database copies. (See figure 8).

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Figure 8: Check overall health status of the DAG

We can see information of database copies by running the below CMDLets. Run below CMDlet to see MB01’s Database copy information. See highlighted area. (See figure 9).

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Figure 9: See MB01 database copy information.

Run Test-ReplicationHealth CMDlet to check replication status of DAG. (See figure 10).

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Figure 10 : Test replication health of DAG.

In this article I have guided you in deploying Database Availability Group, Which is the coolest feature out of many in the new Exchange 2010. I’ll show you how to test failover scenarios in a future article.